Durbin Disputes CBO Finding That 75% Illegal Immigration Will Continue Under Senate Bill

June 19, 2013 - 5:57 PM

durbin

Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) (AP)

(CNSNews.com) – Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said he “disputes” the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) finding that the Senate's “Gang of Eight” immigration bill, S. 744, would reduce the flow of illegal aliens into the United States only by 25 percent.

The cost-estimate report, released on Tuesday, says the legislation would actually allow the flow of new illegal aliens into the United States to continue at a rate equal to 75 percent of the current rate of illegal immigration. This will be the case, in part, said CBO, because of people who overstay temporary work visas that will be authorized by the bill.

As the report says, “CBO estimates that, under the bill, the net annual flow of unauthorized residents would decrease by about 25 percent relative to what would occur under current law ….” (See p. 23. )

When CNSNews.com asked Sen. Durbin (D-Ill.) about the CBO’s estimate, he said, “Well, I saw the reduction; it talked about a reduction of illegals coming into the country – I think it was 100,000 a year for four years or something.”

CNSNews.com then noted that, according to the CBO, “overall, the rate of illegal immigration would be 75% of what it is currently under the bill.”

Durbin said, “Well, “I would just say that I don’t know if they’ve taken – we’re still debating, incidentally, border security, border enforcement. But I would dispute that finding.”

“I think that with the new technology and resources – billions of dollars worth of resources that we’re applying to border security – that we’ll be much safer and many fewer people coming across the border,” Durbin said.

As reported earlier by CNSNews.com, the CBO estimates that 75 percent of illegal immigration would continue if the Senate immigration reform proposal were enacted, including in a section of the report headlined, “Future Unauthorized Residents.”

“Unauthorized residents would find it harder both to enter the country and to find employment while unauthorized,” the report says. “However, other aspects of the bill would probably increase the number of unauthorized residents—in particular, people overstaying their visas issued under the new programs for temporary workers.”

“CBO estimates that, under the bill, the net annual flow of unauthorized residents would decrease by about 25 percent relative to what would occur under current law,” the report says, “resulting in a reduction in the U.S. population (including a reduction in the number of children born in the United States) relative to that benchmark of 1.6 million in 2023 and 2.5 million in 2033.’