Democrats' Approval of Obama Is Slipping

September 25, 2013 - 7:26 AM
obamas

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama return to the White House from New York City on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

(CNSNews.com) - President Obama’s job approval rating among Democrats has averaged 78 percent so far in September, after being at or above 80 percent each month since December 2011, including a high of 91 percent in December 2012.

A new Gallup Poll conducted Sept. 17-18 found that the 13-percentage-point decline in Democrats’ approval rating for the president since last December is greater than the nine-point drop (53-44 percent) among all U.S. adults during the same period.

The Democrats’ approval rating has either declined or held steady each month this year. The last time it showed an increase was in November 2012.

The latest Gallup poll comes as the president is facing several major challenges, both foreign and domestic: The United States is set to default on its debt obligations as early as next month unless Congress passes a law to increase the amount the U.S. can borrow legally.

Gallup also noted the ongoing budget battle, which includes Republican efforts to defund Obamacare; and Obama’s recent handling of the crisis in Syria.

Liberal Democrats remain the most supportive of the president at 85 percent, followed by moderate Democrats at 76 percent and conservative Democrats at 69 percent.

Gallup says overall, 44 percent of Americans approve of the job the president is doing so far this month. That’s down from the 45 percent approval in August, and his rating has dropped at least one percentage point each month through June.

Gallup points out that the president’s approval rating remains above the 41 percent he received from August through October 2011, his lowest monthly averages.

The bottom line, according to Gallup: President Obama’s ability to reach agreements on the budget and federal debt limit may go a long way toward determining whether he can regain support among Democrats and among Americans more generally.