‘Avatar' Director James Cameron: People ‘Propagating this Denial of Climate Change’ Fostering ‘A Very Bleak World’

April 19, 2010 - 4:26 PM
Academy Award-winning Director James Cameron said that "deniers" of climate change are engaging in "fear mongering" and will have to answer to the next generation for the "very bleak world" they are "essentially creating."
(CNSNews.com) - Academy Award-winning Director James Cameron said the "climate deniers" who have the "public ear" are engaging in “fear mongering” and will have to answer to the next generation for the “very bleak world” they are “essentially creating.”
 
In an exclusive interview, CNSNews.com asked Cameron about his remarks concerning conservative critics of his popular movie “Avatar” and whether he could provide some more perspective.
 
Cameron said those critics were “people ranting away, lost in their bubbles of reality, steeped in their own hatred, their own fear and hatred.”
 
Cameron told CNSNews.com last week, “I stand by that” and further said: “I think there’s a lot of demagoguery in this country. I think there’s a lot of fear mongering, and I think it’s done us a huge disservice over the last few years, and I think it’s really starting to hurt us right now.
 
“And the people that are propagating this denial of climate change and that are ranting on in this, kind of, you know, fear mongering, you know, they’re the people that have to answer to my children for the world that they’re propagating and the world that they’re essentially creating, which is going to be a very bleak world,” he added.
 

 
Last Thursday, Cameron participated in a panel discussion about environmental policy on Capitol Hill, sponsored by Rep. Diane E. Watson (D-Calif.).
 
Other panelists included MSNBC host and former Congressman Joe Scarborough, New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, and actress Sigourney Weaver, who played the leading role in Cameron’s 1986 film, “Aliens.”
 
After the panel, CNSNews.com also asked Cameron, “You talked about the disconnect between science and politics and political officials. Could you just talk about the false information that you think is being put out there, specifically?”
 
Cameron said, “Sure. Well, I think there’s a huge disinformation campaign, and it has to do with what I call the ‘relativity of wrong.’
 
“You know, the kind of organized special interest group denial lobbyists and their sort of talk-show host puppets, say all kinds of things and point at scientists that have proven to have incorrect analysis or have been shown, inaccurately it turns out, to have, you know, propagated incorrect analysis into some of their published work,” he said.
 
“That’s like, ‘Okay, that’s a couple guys.’ There are thousands of scientists that are in utter lockstep consensus about this issue. So it’s about the ‘relativity of wrong,’” Cameron added.
 
“Just because a couple of scientists made a couple of mistakes, maybe their work was sloppy – and, by the way, it hasn’t even been proven yet – doesn’t mean that the entire body, the entire consensus is wrong,” said Cameron.  
 
“The problem is, you have a panel – let’s have a panel, let’s get three of the 3,000 scientists who agree, climate scientists who agree, and let’s get three of the 10 scientists that dissent and let’s put them on a panel. Now, you’ve got three against three. It looks like, pretty equal. It’s not. It’s not,” he added.
 
“One is a microscopic percent of the total and the other one is a significantly large fraction,” he said. “But yet that’s how the conversation is framed by these groups. It’s exactly the same thing that was done by the tobacco lobby back when, and it’s being done by the oil and coal lobbyists right now. And, you know, I think that they need to answer for the planet that they are creating.”
 
CNSNews.com also asked Cameron, “Is there any specific group or specific people that need to be targeted for putting out this false information?”
 
Cameron said, “I think we know who the climate deniers are, and they definitely have the public ear and people would much rather have the status quo. In fact, they don’t want the status quo of now, they want status quo of a few years ago, a couple of years ago before the credit crash.
 
“So they want to go back in time to a world that’s never going to exist again rather than moving forward to a vision of sustainability for this country that will improve our economy and make jobs,” he said.
 
Cameron then went on to praise Communist China for its research in and production of renewable energy and questioned why the United States is not following China’s lead.
 
“You know, and I think that the point that the Chinese are the world leaders in renewable energy technology,” said Cameron. “Right now, 60 percent of the solar cells are made in China . They’re employing, you know, hundreds of thousands of people in the renewable energy sector and they don’t need to – they’re a dictatorship, essentially.
 
“You know, they don’t need to answer to their public. They are doing it for very pragmatic, Machiavellian reasons. You know, why aren’t we doing it?” he added.
 
James Cameron won the “Best Picture” Academy Award for “Titanic” in 1997. He lost the award this year to “Hurt Locker” but won in the categories of “Best Art Direction,” “Best Cinematography,” and “Best Visual Effects.” 
 
His movie "Avatar" is the highest-grossing film of all time with more than $2.7 billion in revenue worldwide, beating “Titanic,” which previously held the record. The film will be released on DVD on April 22.