Afghan War Claims 40 U.S. Servicemen in July--Total Fatalities Now 1,954

August 6, 2012 - 12:30 PM

military

U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan. (AP Photo)

(CNSNews.com) -- Forty U.S. servicemen gave their lives serving their country in Afghanistan in July, bringing total U.S. war fatalities in the more-than-decade-long war to 1,954, according to CNSNews.com’s database on Afghan War casualties.

For the total 1,954 deaths, 1,385 have occurred since President Barack Obama was inaugurated on Jan. 20, 2009. That means at least 7 out of every 10 (about 71 percent) deaths in the Afghanistan war, which started in October 2001, have taken place in the three-plus years that Obama has been in the White House.

Statistically, Obama has presided over the top three deadliest years of the war: 2010 with 497 deaths, followed by 2011 with 399 deaths, and 2009 with 303 fatalities.

This year is already the fourth deadliest year of the war with 197 deaths, outpacing 2008 when 151 U.S. military fatalities occurred in Afghanistan. This means that the top-four deadliest years of the war, so far, have occurred during Obama’s executive branch tenure.

The 197 U.S. military deaths that took place from January through July are 15 percent less than the 231 that took place during the same period in 2011.

The 40 deaths each in May and July make those months the deadliest so far in 2012.

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A US soldier, part of the NATO forces, patrols a police station after it was attacked by militants in Kandahar, south of Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, June 19, 2012.(AP Photo/Allauddin Khan)

The deadliest month of the entire war is August 2011: there were 71 fatalities. That month included the deadliest day for coalition forces in Afghanistan when 30 soldiers were killed aboard a helicopter brought down by insurgents on Aug 6.

Historically, the Afghan summer months of June to September are when most of the heavy fighting takes place and thus most of the U.S. military casualties occur.

The majority of 1,954 total deaths stemming from the Afghanistan war have been combat-related. Non-combat deaths involve accidents, drowning, and illnesses, among other reasons that do not involve military activity.

About 9 out of every 10 American deaths in July 2012, as well as throughout the war have stemmed from military activity and as a result are categorized as combat-related fatalities.

Homemade bombs, formally known as Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), are the most widely used weapons by insurgents against U.S.-led coalition forces; IEDs are responsible for over half the American military deaths this year and throughout the war.

In July 2012 alone, insurgents used IEDs to kill 20 U.S. soldiers, which is 50 percent of all fatalities that month.

The southern provinces of Kandahar and Helmand, which border Pakistan and have been the hub of military activity, continue to be the deadliest for U.S. forces.

However, U.S. military activity and the concentration of fatalities that come with it is increasingly moving to Afghan provinces in the East of the country not necessarily on, but near the border with Pakistan.

Most U.S. military deaths since the war started have occurred in Afghan provinces that border Pakistan. High-ranking U.S. military officials, and most recently the 2011 Country Reports on Terrorism issued last week by the State Department, has accused Pakistan of providing a safe haven to insurgents in Afghanistan.

President Obama has endorsed a plan that will keep some U.S. forces in Afghanistan beyond 2014 to support training and counterterrorism operations led by the Afghan army and police. The scope of the U.S. force that will stay behind has not been announced.

CNSNews.com’s detailed database of U.S. military fatalities in the Afghanistan war is sourced by official Department of Defense (DOD) casualty reports enhanced by information taken from the U.S.-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and media accounts.

The CNSNews.com count of U.S. military fatalities in the Afghan War includes all U.S. military personnel who died or were fatally injured in Afghanistan itself, plus four who died on ships at sea supporting operations in Afghanistan and 12 who died in Pakistan.

It does not count military personnel who have died while participating in other regions of the world under Operation Enduring Freedom, where they were not supporting military operations in Afghanistan.

In addition to Afghanistan, for example, Operation Enduring Freedom covers U.S.-led military activity in 15 countries including Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

American military deaths under the overall Operation Enduring Freedom marked a grim milestone in June as they surpassed 2,000. There have been at least 118 American fatalities in locations other than Afghanistan since the operation started in 2001.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Name and Cause of Death of U.S. Soldiers Who Died in Afghanistan War in July 2012:

Army Pfc. Cody O. Moosman, 24, of Preston, Idaho, killed July 3, in Gayan Alwara Mandi, Afghanistan,by enemy small arms fire.

Army Staff Sgt. Raul M. Guerra, 37, of Union City, N.J., died July 4, in Spin Boldak, Afghanistan of an unspecified cause.

Army Capt. Bruce A. MacFarlane, 46, of Oviedo, Florida, died July 6, in Kandahar, Afghanistan of an unspecified cause.

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Army Cpl. Juan P. Navarro, 23, of Austin, Texas, killed July 7, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Cpl. Juan P. Navarro, 23, of Austin, Texas, killed July 7, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Staff Sgt. Ricardo Seija, 31, of Tampa, Fla., killed July 8, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Spc. Erica P. Alecksen, 21, of Eatonton, Ga., killed July 8, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Spc. Clarence Williams III, 23, of Brooksville, Fla., killed July 8, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Pfc. Trevor B. Adkins, 21, of Spring Lake, N.C., killed July 8, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Pfc. Alejandro J. Pardo, 21, of Porterville, Calif., killed July 8, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Pfc. Cameron J. Stambaugh, 20, of Spring Grove, Pa., killed July 8, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Spc. Jonathan Batista, 22, of Kinnelon, N.J., killed July 8, in Zharay, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, by enemy small arms fire.

Army Spc. Sterling W. Wyatt, 21, of Columbia, Mo., killed July 11, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, by wounds caused by an enemy IED.

Army Sgt. Michael E. Ristau, 25, of Rockford, Ill., killed July 13 in Qalat, Zabul province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Sgt. Erik N. May, 26, of Independence, Kan., died July 14, in Ghazni province, Afghanistan of an unspecified cause.

Army Staff Sgt. Carl E. Hammar, 24, of Lake Havasu City, Ariz., killed July 14, in Khost province, Afghanistan, by wounds caused by enemy small arms fire.

Army Spc. Sergio E. Perez Jr., 21, of Crown Point, Ind., killed July 16, in Wali Kot District, Afghanistan, by injuries caused by enemy rocket propelled grenades (RPGs).

Army Spc. Nicholas A. Taylor, 20, of Berne, Ind., killed July 16, in Wali Kot District, Afghanistan, by injuries caused by enemy RPGs.

Army Spc. Krystal M. Fitts, 26, of Houston, Texas, killed July 17, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, by injuries suffered from indirect fire.

Army Sgt. Daniel A. Rodriguez, 28, of Baltimore, Md., killed July 18, in Ghazni City, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Sgt. Jose J. Reyes, 24, San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico., killed July 18, in Ghazni City, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Marine Cpl. Joshua R. Ashley, 23, of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., killed July 19, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Spc. Darrion T. Hicks, 21, of Raleigh, N.C., killed July 19, in Ghazni, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Pfc. Jeffrey L. Rice, 24, of Troy, Ohio, died July 19, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, of an unspecified cause.

Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael J. Brodsky, 33, of Tamarac, Fla., killed July 21 at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Landstuhl, Germany, by IED-caused injuries sustained July 7 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan.

Army Staff Sgt. Brandon R. Pepper, 31, of York, Pa., killed July 21, in Ghazni province, Afghanistan, by enemy attack.

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Army Pfc. Julian L. Colvin, 21, of Birmingham, Ala., killed July 22, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Pfc. Julian L. Colvin, 21, of Birmingham, Ala., killed July 22, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Staff Sgt. Richard L. Berry, 27, of Scottsdale, Ariz., killed July 22, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Spc. Justin L. Horsley, 21, of Palm Bay, Fla., killed July 22, in Pul-E Alam, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Pfc. Brenden N. Salazar, 20, of Chuluota, Fla., killed July 22, in Pul-E Alam, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Sgt. Eric E. Williams, 27, of Murrieta, Calif., killed July 23, in Pul-E Alam, Afghanistan, by enemy fire.

Army Pfc. Adam C. Ross, 19, of Lyman, S.C., killed July 24, in Wardak province, Afghanistan, by small arms fire.

Marine Sgt. Justin M. Hansen, 26, of Traverse City, Mich., killed July 24, in Badghis province, by small arms fire.

Army 1st Lt. Sean R. Jacobs, 23, of Redding, Calif., killed July 26, in Khakrez, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Sgt. John E. Hansen, 41, of Austin, Texas., killed in July 26, in Khakrez, Afghanistan, by an enemy IED.

Army Pfc. Theodore M. Glende, 23, of Rochester, N.Y., killed in July 27, in Kharwar, Logar province, Afghanistan, by small-arms fire.

Army Spc. Benjamin C. Pleitez, 25, of Turlock, Calif., died July 27, in Mazar E Sharif, Afghanistan of an unspecified cause.

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Army Sgt. Eric E. Williams, 27, of Murrieta, Calif., killed July 23, in Pul-E Alam, Afghanistan, by enemy fire.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Bobby L. Estle, 38, of Lebanon, Ohio, killed July 28, in Wardak province, Afghanistan, by small arms fire.

Army Pfc. Jose Oscar Belmontes, 28, of La Verne, Calif., killed July 28, in Wardak province, Afghanistan, by small arms fire.

Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jonathan W. Gifford, 34, of Palm Bay, Fla., killed July 29, in Badghis province, Afghanistan, by enemy fire.

Marine Gunnery Sgt. Daniel J. Price, 27, of Holland, Mich., killed July 29, in Badghis province, Afghanistan, by enemy fire.