63% of Babies Aborted in Texas Are Black or Hispanic; Annual Total Exceeds Population of Galveston

July 10, 2013 - 12:35 PM

baby

(AP Photo)

(CNSNews.com) - In Texas, where the state House today approved a bill that would prohibit abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy, 63 percent of the babies aborted in the most recent year on record were black or Hispanic, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In fact, the black and Hispanic babies aborted in Texas in the latest year on record exceeded the entire population of the city of Galveston.

Each year, the CDC publishes an “Abortion Surveillance” report. The most recent report, published on Nov. 23, 2012, presents abortion data for calendar year 2009. For that year, 27 states plus the District of Columbia provided the CDC not only with their overall abortion numbers, but also with those numbers categorized by how many abortions were done on non-Hispanic white women, non-Hispanic black women, Hispanic women, and women of other races or ethnicities. (New York City also reported the abortions done within the municipality and the race and ethnicity of the women whose babies were aborted.)

Overall, there were 435,480 abortions in these 27 states and the District of Columbia that reported abortion by race and ethnicity for 2009. Of these 435,480 abortions, 163,975 (or 37.7 percent) killed non-Hispanic white babies, 154,266 (or 35.4 percent) killed non-Hispanic black babies, 89,846 (or 20.6 percent) killed Hispanic babies, and 27,393 (or 6.3 percent) killed babies of other races or ethnicities.

In Texas in 2009, abortionists killed 77,152 unborn babies, according to the CDC.

Of those 77,152 babies aborted in Texas, 24,457 (or 31.7 percent) were non-Hispanic white babies, 19,152 (or 24.8 percent) were non-Hispanic black babies, 29,576 (or 38.3 percent) were Hispanic babies, and 3,967 (or 5.1 percent) were babies of other races or ethnicities.

The combined 48,728 black and Hispanic babies aborted in Texas in 2009 equaled 63.1 percent of the total of 77,152 abortions in the state.

Black babies were aborted in Texas at more than twice the rate of blacks in the state's population. According to the Census Bureau, 12.3 percent of the people in Texas are black. However, 24.8 percent of the babies aborted in Texas were black.

Hispanic babies were aborted in Texas at a rate approximately equal to the rate of Hispanics in the Texas population. According to the Census Bureau, 38.2 percent of the people in Texas are Hispanic. According to the CDC, 38.3 percent of the babies aborted in Texas were Hispanic.

White babies were aborted in Texas at a rate that was less than the rate of whites in the Texas population. According to the Census Bureau, 44.5 percent of the people in Texas are non-Hispanic whites. However, only 31.7 percent of the babies aborted in Texas were non-Hispanic whites.

The 48,728 black and Hispanic babies aborted in Texas in 2009 outnumbered the 47,762 people who, according to the Census Bureau, live in Galveston, Texas.

The overall total of 77,152 babies aborted in Texas in 2009 outnumbered the 73,238 people who, according to the Census Bureau, live in Baytown, Texas.

Planned Parenthood, a vocal opponent of the Texas bill that would outlaw abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy, was founded by Margaret Sanger, who argued that some Americans should be sterilized or segregated.

In the April 1932 edition of Birth Control Review, Sanger published what she called “A Plan for Peace.” One plank in this "peace" plan was: “to apply a stern and rigid policy of sterilization and segregation to that grade of population whose progeny is already tainted, or whose inheritance is such that objectionable traits may be transmitted to offspring.”

Another plank in Sanger’s "peace" plan was: “to give certain dysgenic groups in our population their choice of segregation or sterilization.”

Planned Parenthood has published a “Fact Sheet” which it says is “designed to separate fact from fiction and to further explain Sanger’s views and the background against which they must be judged.”

Part of this “Fact Sheet” is headlined “Was Sanger racially motivated.” “The patriarchal racism of the social policy of the time and the well-intentioned paternalism of philanthropists to ‘lift up’ African-Americans, may have influenced Sanger,” Planned Parenthood says. “But there is no evidence Sanger, or the Federation, intended to coerce black women into using birth control.”

Another section of Planned Parenthood’s “Fact Sheet” is headlined “Sanger and Eugenics.” “Sanger, however, clearly identified with the broader issues of health and fitness that concerned the early 20th-century eugenics movement, which was enormously popular and well-respected during the 1920s and 1930s—decades in which treatments for many hereditary and disabling conditions were unknown.”

But, according to Planned Parenthood, Sanger’s identification with what Planned Parenthood describes as this “well-respected” eugenics movement did not mean she wanted race to be a factor in determining—to use the words of Sanger's own "peace" plan—which people should be “given their choice of sterilization or segregation”

“But Sanger,” says Planned Parenthood, “always believed that reproductive decisions should be made on an individual and not a social or cultural basis, and she consistently and firmly repudiated any racial application of eugenics principles.”

Each year, Planned Parenthood gives out its “Margaret Sanger Award,” which the oganization describes as its “highest honor.”

Planned Parenthood says it did 333,964 abortions in 2011.