Seven Times Government Has Given Out Numbers to Phone Sex Lines

April 2, 2014 - 5:05 PM

"Welcome to America's hottest talk line!  Ladies, to talk to interesting and exciting guys free, press one now.  Guys, hot ladies are waiting to talk to you.  Press two to connect free now."

That was what some callers to California's Affordable Care Act Health Exchange website heard when they called to try and sign up for health insurance.

Apparently, the number that was posted on the website had one digit wrong. As a result, customers who were rushing to sign up for Obamacare on the last day of open enrollment, ended up being offered a chance to talk dirty to some sexy singles.

While this may appear to be just one more ridiculous example of utter incompetence, brought to you by the people who are now in charge of the nation's health care system, this isn't the first time that a government phone number intended to help citizens has resulted in callers being offered some steamy conversation.

In fact, it happens surprisingly often.

Here are some of the most recent examples of this bizarre phenomenon.

1. In 2008 a phone line was set up by U.S. Department of Fish & Wildlife, in order for Americans to purchase a stamp that would allow them to hunt ducks during the upcoming season.  A card provided listed two numbers where the stamps could be purchased.  The first number listed was 1-800-STAMP24.  But, due to a printing error, the alternative number to call if that number was busy was listed as 1-800-TRAMP24.

While the duck stamps cost $15 a piece, when duck hunters called the number listed they were offered a far better deal.  For only $1.99 a minute a recorded message offered callers the opportunity to "..talk to the girls that turn you on."  WHAT A DEAL!!

Interestingly enough, in a rare display of federal government frugality, the fish and wildlife people decided that it would be too expensive to reprint the cards with the correct number - and let duck hunting enthusiasts figure it out for themselves for the remainder of the season.

2. In 2012, Florida Governor Rick Scott directed Floridians to call the state's Department of Health if the wanted information about a fungal meningitis outbreak.

During his announcement, Scott inadvertently gave out the wrong number which led callers to an automated message featuring a sultry young female who said "Hello boys; thank you for calling me on my anniversary," and then directed the concerned citizens to a menu featuring a host of "naughty options."

It is unclear whether the young girl featured in the recording had fungal meningitis.  But, it's pretty likely.

3. In Florida, a year later, deputies in Lake County printed up a brochure that listed the rights of victims of sexual assault and domestic violence.  It also provided an emergency hotline number, which directed people to a sex line instead.  When dialed, a recorded message said, "Welcome to America's hottest talk line. Ladies, to talk to interesting and exciting guys free, press one now. Guys, hot ladies are waiting to talk to you."

4.  Last February, a Georgia woman inquiring about her child-care services was directed to a sex hotline, despite dialing a government-issued phone number.  The woman, thinking this was an error, dialed the number at least four more times, but still got directed to the adult phone service.

5.  In October of 2013, San Francisco residents, fed up with the noise from the Nike Women's Marathon, were directed by the city to call 1-800-RUN-NIKE to voice their complaints.  When dialed, a woman told the callers to "unzip that fly, baby."

6.  In Santa Fe County, New Mexico, the local government site listed two phone numbers on its contact page.  Do I really have to say where those two numbers led constituents to? The sex hotline numbers were subsequently taken down.

7. Last January, it was discovered that a former child seat information line operated by the Colorado State Patrol had turned into a phone sex line. According to KDVR-TV, Denver, the Colorado Children's Hospital and the Colorado Department of Transportation listed the state patrol's child seat safety hotline as 1-877-LUV-TOTS.

Needless to say, that hotline number put the state patrol on the hot seat after parents called looking for information on child seats for cars.