Sen. Rand Paul: 'Heads Should Roll on This,' If CIA Is Spying on Congress

March 13, 2014 - 5:24 PM

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) had some tough words today for CIA Director John Brennan over the alleged search into Congressional computers storing sensitive information. Of course, Brennan denied these allegations, which was mocked by the Daily Show last night.

Sen. Paul, on today's Laura Ingraham Show, said:

"My first question might be to the Head of the CIA: 'Are you testifying in the 'least untruthful way,' or are you actually going to tell us the truth?'"

"This is a serious breach here...if this is true - and I think we need to get to the bottom of this - heads should roll on this. You cannot have the intelligence committee basically being so arrogant that they would even spy on their elected officials," Paul added.

Yet, while Paul may have the CIA in his crosshairs, he might have his eyes on the White House, as well.

Until recently, it would've been impossible for Sen. Paul to run for re-election to the U.S. Senate and the presidency at the same time.  But, they may be changing, according to the Lexington Herald-Leader:

A revised bill that would allow U.S. Sen. Rand Paul to run for re-election and the presidency on the same Kentucky ballot in 2016 was cleared by a state Senate committee Wednesday, picking up one Democratic vote along the way.

State Sen. Morgan McGarvey, D-Louisville, joined Republicans on the Senate State and Local Government Committee in voting to send the proposal to the full Senate after it was changed to specify that the bill applies only to candidates running for president or vice president of the United States.

State law now says no candidate can appear on the same ballot twice in a general election. Primary elections appear to be excluded from the current law.

But, it seems to have little chance of passing the Democratic-controlled State House:

The bill appears to have little chance of passing the Democratic-led House, with Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, saying last week that "we kind of take the position over here that a man (who) can't decide which office he wants to run for isn't fit to hold either office."