Obama Calls Failed DOJ Nomination 'Travesty;' Policemen 'Proud' of Senate Vote

March 5, 2014 - 5:11 PM

While Pres. Obama declared it a "travesty based on wildly unfair character attacks," the Fraternal Order of Police cheered today's 52-47 Senate vote rejecting cloture on the motion to proceed to the nomination of Debo P. Adegbile to be the next Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice.

In criticizing the vote, Obama said the nomination was defeated only because Adegbile had defended Mumia Abu-Jamala, a convicted murderer of a police officer.

"The Senate's failure to confirm Debo Adegbile to lead the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice is a travesty based on wildly unfair character attacks against a good and qualified public servant.  Mr. Adegbile's qualifications are impeccable.  He represents the best of the legal profession, with wide-ranging experience, and the deep respect of those with whom he has worked."

"The fact that his nomination was defeated solely based on his legal representation of a defendant runs contrary to a fundamental principle of our system of justice - and those who voted against his nomination denied the American people an outstanding public servant."

But, the Fraternal Order of Police, who publicly opposed the nomination, applauded today's vote.

Chuck Canterbury, National President of the Fraternal Order of Police, commended the 52-47 Senate vote rejecting cloture on the motion to proceed to the nomination of Debo P. Adegbile to be the next Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice.

"I am very proud and pleased that a majority of the Senate agreed with the FOP and other law enforcement organizations on this nominee," Canterbury said after the vote.

"Many of our closest allies and champions-those who know the FOP well and who are close to the law enforcement community-were conflicted between their belief that the President should be allowed to have his choice lead the Civil Rights Division and the nearly unanimous opposition from the law enforcement community," Canterbury stated. "But I was very pleased and heartened that all of our allies, regardless of their vote today, listened to our earnest arguments and objections."