YouTube Video Doesn't Reveal the Truth about Abortion

June 6, 2014 - 8:07 AM

Last month, a 25-year-old woman named Emily Letts burst onto the national stage when her YouTube video, which appeared to show her own abortion procedure, went viral. Overnight, Letts was transformed from an obscure pro-abortion advocate to a media darling as My Positive Abortion Story soared beyond 1 million views and became the "headline du jour" for media outlets such as Salon, The Huffington Post, and The Daily Caller.

A counselor at a New Jersey abortion clinic, Letts became pregnant. Unlike 80 percent of abortion-determined women who admit to wrestling with the idea of terminating their unborn child's life1, Letts confidently proclaimed to her YouTube audience that she was "not ready to have children" and she "will be having an abortion tomorrow morning." She later admitted she thought of her unborn child as a "potential life" and despite her choice to terminate her pregnancy, she'd always have a "special relationship with her sonogram." . . .

The next clip of the video shows Letts wearing surgical scrubs and being placed on a gurney with stirrups. Between the lighthearted chuckles shared by Letts and the medical staff, the upbeat background music, and her repetitive murmurings of "I'm a lucky girl," Letts attempts to provide her viewers with a firsthand look at a real-life abortion. Unfortunately, her attempt fails miserably.

While the video shows Letts holding hands with a clinic worker as they chitchat their way through the procedure, the video never shows more than Letts's face. We never see the knives, poison, or vacuums that may have been used to extract Letts's baby. And we don't get a glimpse into Emily Letts's life one year, three years, or even ten years down the road when the media storm has passed, the applause has ceased, and the reality of her choice sets in.

But here at Online for Life we have seen multitudes of "Emily Lettses" through our efforts. Each month, dozens of them visit our website AbortionMemorial.com to share their heartbreaking abortion stories as they mourn the loss of their children. With words of sorrow, they confess the guilt and pain they continually suffer as a result of their abortions. They share about the substance abuse, the promiscuity, and the self-mutilation that has tainted their lives since the deaths of their unborn children. And they also share about the loneliness and self-doubt that shadows every waking moment.

While Letts may try to normalize abortion and convince people that abortion is positive and celebratory, the testimonies posted on the wall at AbortionMemorial.com tell a dramatically different story:

"I have never stopped grieving the baby I had whisked away from my body 37 years ago. It was just too easy to get an abortion during those days." - Mariette

"The abortion took me down a lot of roads I never thought I would go, from drugs to promiscuity...All because of the abortion." - Anonymous

"Oh, how I miss you, my sweet boy! To think you'd be five years old this year! Oh, how I'd love to know what you would have looked like, sounded like, laughed like. I know I made the biggest mistake of my life not having you." - Ashley

AbortionMemorial.com is a safe place for mothers, fathers, grandparents, and other family members to remember children who were lost to abortion. As one of the leading pro-life nonprofits in the country, Online for Life seeks to help rescue babies and their families from abortion through the unique combination of compassion and technology.

And through our efforts, we are making great strides toward bringing an end to the abortion holocaust in America. It's our message of grace and compassion that has not only disrupted the pro-abortion movement, but is helping to rescue babies and families from abortion nationwide.

As long as there are sites like AbortionMemorial.com, where women and men can expose the true and haunting aftereffects of abortion, the Emily Lettses of the world will have a diminishing impact on the case for abortion in our country.

1 http://www.abortionfacts.com/reardon/women-who-abort-their-reflections-on-the-unborn