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July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 26th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research.CNSNews.comwill publish an additional story each day.)
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 41st of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 57th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 72nd of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)The day after Thanksgiving in 1990, John Pozsgai began serving a three-year prison sentence in Pennsylvania's Allenwood Federal Prison. He wasn't convicted of burglary, armed robbery or a violent crime like murder or assault. Pozsgai was serving hard time because he violated the Clean Water Act.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 89th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)Fears of obscene gestures and rising property values delayed a housing project for six years in the rapidly growing community of Zeeland in southwestern Michigan while the courts sorted out the validity of the concerns.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the ninth of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.) In August 2000, Theresa Horn, a home-schooling mother in Bolivar, Tenn., was arrested in front of her husband and three young sons, 1, 3 and 5 years of age, allegedly for violating a compulsory student attendance law.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note:The following is the 27th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)Grant Griffin just can't sleep in his home anymore. His one-bedroom apartment in Bradenton, Fla., has had some unwelcome company - a colony of bats. During the day, bats can often be found in his sink or other areas around his home. At night, the bats' incessant noisemaking keeps Griffin awake.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 42nd of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)The Blackfeet Nation Indian tribe in Montana has only seen a fraction of the billions of dollars owed to its members by the federal government, thanks to what Federal District Court Justice Royce C. Lamberth called the "most egregious misconduct by the federal government" he has ever seen.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 58th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)In 1978, Wayne Hage and his late wife, Jean, began operating a Nevada cattle-ranch with 2,000 head of cattle. Over the next 12 years, the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management accused them of violations that included having their cattle in impermissible areas and not maintaining their fences.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 73rd of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.) Residents of Utah's Heartland Mobile Home Park soon may be forced to pay up to $230 more per month in water bills. The culprit? No, not drought. Not even higher taxes - at least, not directly.No, the culprit will be new regulations to reduce the level of arsenic present in drinking water, set to take effect in 2006.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 90th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 10th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)After moving to Lynn, Mass., in 1993, Michael and Virginia Brunnelle decided not to enroll their five children in public schools, opting instead to educate them at home.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 28th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research.CNSNews.comwill publish an additional story each day.)
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 43rd of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)The National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) is preventing the Cherokee Indians in Cherokee, N.C., from building a new school.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 59th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)In 1923, the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement near Garrison, N.Y., agreed to allow the federal government to run the Maine-to-Georgia Appalachian Trail through a portion of their Greymoor Monastery. But, given an inch, the government then wanted to take a mile, and the friars may have regretted their generosity.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 74th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 91st of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 11th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dream, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)Lonzo Archie is a diabetic African-American in his late 60s whose land was condemned by the state of Mississippi to make way for a new Nissan Motor Company parking lot. Archie has lived on the property most of his life and does not want to move.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 12th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)St. Luke's Church in North Hempstead, N.Y., provides more than church services to the community. The church also helps members of the community with heating oil, rent money and drug counseling.
July 7, 2008, 8:21 PM EDT
(Editor's Note: The following is the 28th of 100 stories regarding government regulation from the book Shattered Dreams, written by the National Center for Public Policy Research. CNSNews.com will publish an additional story each day.)