My Articles

July 7, 2008, 8:32 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has left the Republican Party and has changed his voting status to "unaffiliated," further fueling speculation that he may run for president."A nonpartisan approach has worked wonders in New York," Bloomberg said in a statement. "We've balanced budgets, grown our economy, improved public health, reformed the school system and made the nation's safest city even safer."
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New Jersey's smoking ban, the 11th such prohibition in the nation, puts a stop to smoking inside public places -- all except the casinos of Atlantic City. New Jersey's ban on lighting up includes restaurants and bars, public transit areas, sports facilities including race tracks and bowling alleys, health-care facilities, parking areas, lobbies, bingo parlors, malls, all public schools and school grounds, theaters, clubs, concert halls, museums and libraries.
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - Going into September, GOP U.S. Senate candidate Tom Kean, Jr. was either leading polls or in statistical ties with his Democratic rival, Sen. Bob Menendez. At the time, Menendez was fighting through a storm of allegations and a federal probe of wrongdoing involving grant money steered to a nonprofit organization renting a house he owned.
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - The New Jersey Supreme Court's decision to have the state Legislature tackle the issue of same-sex "marriage" has divided an already partisan state Senate and Assembly, and the repercussions may impact New Jersey's bitterly contested U.S. Senate race.
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New Jersey voters apparently were more concerned about Iraq than they were about corruption on Tuesday, when they sent Democrat incumbent Sen. Robert Menendez back to Washington.The contest was characterized by Menendez's pledge to "stand up to George Bush" and by Republican Tom Kean, Jr.'s attempts to remind voters that his opponent was "under federal criminal investigation.""The real issues of the state were overshadowed this year by the national concerns," said former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman, a liberal Republican.
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - Buoyed by his party's successes in the midterm election, New York Democrat Rep. Charles Rangel has renewed his earlier call for reinstating the military draft - but as with earlier attempts, his latest proposal was quickly shot down.Both House Speaker-to-be Nancy Pelosi and House Majority Leader-elect Steny Hoyer told reporters that a resolution on the subject is not planned for when the new, Democrat-led Congress convenes in January.
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - A series of recent polls show Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), who just last month won re-election by a landslide, trailing against likely Republican challengers for the presidency in 2008.A Fox News poll of registered voters shows Clinton losing a hypothetical race against Republican Sen. John McCain 48-40, and against former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Clinton trails by a nine-point margin.
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - On the verge of leaving office, New Jersey Acting Gov. Richard Codey has ordered that high school athletes in the state will have to undergo random drug testing for steroids in the 2006 school year.While the news was cheered by some people, others are concerned that the tests will have to be funded by residents who already feel overtaxed and are saddled with a multi-billion-dollar state budget deficit.
July 7, 2008, 8:31 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New York Democratic Sen. Hillary Clinton has more than a 40 to one campaign cash advantage over the most significant challenger to her Senate seat. For that reason and several others, Clinton is expected to win re-election this year in landslide fashion. However, more New Yorkers still want her to remain where she is, rather than run for president in 2008.
July 7, 2008, 8:30 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg doesn't have to run for re-election until 2005, but Republicans dissatisfied with the GOP mayor's liberal leanings and Democratic insiders have already begun to speculate about who might mount an intra-part challenge.
July 7, 2008, 8:30 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - As thousands of same-sex couples get marriage licenses in San Francisco -- by order of the Democratic mayor -- a small group of Republicans sees nothing wrong with men marrying men and women marrying women."It's a pretty basic issue. It's about equality," said Plattsburgh, N.Y., Mayor Daniel Stewart, who is openly homosexual. Plattsburgh, located along the banks of Lake Champlain near the US-Canadian border, has a population of just over 18,000.
July 7, 2008, 8:30 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - He went from being an altar boy to graduating with a master's degree from Harvard University. A former assistant prosecutor, mayor of Woodbridge, state senator and state assemblyman, he rose through the ranks to become New Jersey's 51st governor, so it caught many people in the state -- and the nation -- by surprise when Gov. James McGreevey announced to the world that he "is a gay American."
July 7, 2008, 8:30 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New Jersey four years ago dealt then-presidential candidate George W. Bush one of his worst state-level defeats. Bush knew he never had a chance in New Jersey so he decided not to campaign in the Garden State and lost by 16 points to Democrat Al Gore.Fast-forward to 2004, to a time and place in which residents are unmistakably and dramatically affected by the events of Sept. 11, 2001.
July 7, 2008, 8:30 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - "I am sorry that I have disappointed the citizens of the state of New Jersey who gave me this enormous trust," said New Jersey Governor James McGreevey in his farewell address to the state on Monday. He officially leaves office next week.In his last speech as governor, McGreevey, a Democrat, touted his positive accomplishments, but he did not mention the scandals that plagued his shortened term, including the alleged homosexual affair with a state employee that prompted him to resign.
July 7, 2008, 8:29 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New Jersey Democrats have tapped three-time former Senator Frank Lautenberg - age 78 - to replace Sen. Robert Torricelli on the ballot -- that is, if they can get his name on the ballot. On Wednesday, both Democrats and Republicans were heading to New Jersey Supreme Court to present arguments for and against allowing Lautenberg's name to appear on the ballot. Republicans say state law forbids it; Democrats argue the voters' best interests should prevail.
July 7, 2008, 8:29 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - The New Jersey Supreme Court on Wednesday boosted the hopes of Senate Democrats, who are determined to hold onto their one-vote majority in the Senate.In a unanimous vote, the state's highest court said New Jersey Democrats may replace Sen. Robert Torricelli on the November ballot with former Sen. Frank Lautenberg, even though the deadline under state law for making such a change had already passed.
July 7, 2008, 8:29 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - The U.S. Supreme Court Monday gave the go-ahead for New Jersey Democrats to replace Sen. Robert Torricelli on the November ballot with former Sen. Frank Lautenberg.
July 7, 2008, 8:29 PM EDT
(Correction: Fixes name of National Republican Senatorial Committee in 2nd to last paragraph.)(CNSNews.com) - If ethics charges doomed the re-election chances of New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bob Torricelli, it may have been the abortion issue that ensured defeat for the Republican hoping to replace Torricelli in Washington, according to pro-life groups in the state.
July 7, 2008, 8:29 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - A series of political missteps by New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey, combined with the popularity of President Bush, may have leveled the playing field in a state that's considered a Democratic stronghold. With the 2004 general and 2005 gubernatorial election around the corner, Democratic victories may not be so certain, some analysts think.
July 7, 2008, 8:29 PM EDT
(CNSNews.com) - New Jersey's liberal Republican Party leadership may be witnessing a surge of conservative ideology and candidates for the State Legislature. Where once it was taboo for New Jersey Republicans to openly refer to themselves as "pro-life" or "a conservative leader," this message is now becoming the foundation of several campaigns, including one against the current State Senate president.